Seared Tofu with Two Sauces

Seared Tofu with Two Sauces

I missed this space, and wanted to get back to it. As a start, a gallery of sorts, of some of my work from the last while. These were for my column with the Globe and Mail; I am thinking I'll start posting outtakes so there's a head's up for new work. 

Be back soon with something just for here. See you then. 

 Boozy Black Raspberry Float

Boozy Black Raspberry Float

 Seeded Date  Marmalade Tahini Knots

Seeded Date

Marmalade Tahini Knots

 Barbecue Braised Tomatoes

Barbecue Braised Tomatoes

 Golden Turmeric Pots de Crème

Golden Turmeric Pots de Crème

Posted
Authortara
Tagsrecent
Russeted pears | Tara O'Brady

Hey guys! There's a slight change of plans. Due to concerns about the weather, the Terrain's Autumn Festival and my event tomorrow (4 October) at their Glen Mills, PA location has been postponed to the 17th of the month—as of now the timing should be the same, but I'll keep you posted on any other changes! For now, east coast pals, stay warm and dry, and will see you in two weeks. 

In case you missed the initial announcement, I will be hosting a brunch at Terrain with the meal inspired by my cookbook; there will be a cocktail, drinks, some favourite dishes and I'll be on hand to chat and visit, and to demonstrate a recipe. The brunch requires RSVP, and some tickets are still available if you're able to come! The brunch starts Terrain's Autumn Bounty Festival, a full day of activities to kick off the season. 

Hope you can make it, and more events for the east are in the works! That recipe I promised will follow this announcement shortly, and it's kind of a game changer. Stay tuned. 

xo

 

Posted
Authortara
Categoriesannouncement

In the quickest of updates, I wanted to point you in the direction of a story I did for the Globe and Mail this week; it's about Peach Plum Pie, which is my ideal rendition of a stone fruit dessert for this time of year. The pastry is a keeper, first and foremost, easy to make and supremely forgiving. The filling, voluptuous without too much ooze, is scented with almond and vanilla. It is a good way to ease into fall baking, and the colour from the plums—magenta in the bowl but deepening on baking, so the pie is streaked through with its blush—is a pretty spectacular goodbye to summer if I do say so myself.

Quiet Acres Farm Stand | Tara O'Brady
Peach Plum Pie for the Globe + Mail | Tara O'Brady
Peach Plum Pie for the Globe + Mail | Tara O'Brady

Also! I'm heading to Pennsylvania next month for an event! I will be hosting a brunch at Terrain's Glen Mills location, on October 4, 2015 from 10 to 11:30 AM. The menu will be inspired by recipes from my book, and I'll be demonstrating a dish, plus there'll be lots of time to chat and say hello. Ticket information and details are available on Terrain's site, and I hope you'll be able to make it. It's also the weekend of their Autumn Bounty Festival, so it should be a great time.

Back with a recipe in a few days. See you soon!

p.s. for anyone visiting locally, the farm stand photographed is Quiet Acres in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. 

Posted
Authortara
Categoriesannouncement
19 CommentsPost a comment
Succotash Hand Pies for the Globe and Mail | Tara O'Brady

So, it's July! That seems a surprise. May was a blur of book tour, then June was gone in a blink. I'm firmly settled back at home, and scheming about east coast events. 

Thank you, again, for the cheers from all over with the launch of my cookbook. Thank you for coming out to events or comments here and elsewhere. Never did I feel I was travelling alone. But, we'll catch up on all that. First, some quick things that have been keeping me inspired, busy, and in the kitchen lately. 

I finished Jess's book, Stir last night, and I'm still thinking about it. She's out right now on book tour, and if you can catch her speaking, do.  (Sweet Amandine)

I started Tara's book today. (Tea and Cookies) 

Alabama White Barbecue Sauce, a gutsy mix of horseradish, vinegar, and mayonnaise, is a new favourite of mine with all things grilled — but I love it especially with corn. Fire-kissed is still the preference, but I'll take the kernels steamed, sautéed, or fresh off the cob. If you like elote, I've a feeling the combination will be right up your alley. It was what I served alongside the succotash my hand pies up above. Those guys are from a piece I wrote for The Globe and Mail. I've been making such pies for years, long enough that they've earned a nickname — "empbananas" — in our household. These are filled with corn and beans, then seasoned with herbs and white miso. The latter might seem unexpected, but it makes all the difference, in the best way. (The New York Times / The Globe and Mail)

As a rule, I don't love tomato soup. There are exceptions, though. Melissa Clark's is one, and Nigel Slater's recent variations make a convincing case for consideration. (101 Cookbooks / The Guardian)

Nikole has some new pieces in her shop; the striped stoneware series make me feel nostalgic for the crockery from my father's ships. These nested mixing bowls are now my go-to. The smallest for whisking sauces, the medium for tossing salads, and the large for cookie doughs. (Herriott Grace)

Cherry season has just begun, and I'm thinking of making a cobbler. (Instagram)

The Mosé. (Epicurious)

The Meaning of Mangoes by Dianne Jacob. I keep going back to it. Without summarizing her piece, I'll just say that I feel like I sometimes feed my boys certain things — mangoes, guavas, and especially custard apples when I miss Gigi — in a similar way. Not only for me to resurrect times, places, and people I've lost, but to also pass on to them some of an unshared experience. (Lucky Peach / this site)

And, some more links to mentions of Seven Spoons elsewhere. 

  • I was stoked to talk to Williams Sonoma about the history of Canada Day, and how we Canadians celebrate our country's birthday. I also shared my recipe for Butter Tart Pie. (Taste
  • David took the pickled strawberry preserves from my book and added his own touch — swapping allspice for coriander. He's a smart one. (David Lebovitz)
  • It was seriously smile-inducing to see the Roasted Grapes with Sweet Labneh get the Molly treatment. (My Name is Yeh)
  • Carolyn Jung was truly kind, and made the Hummus with White Miso. (Food Gal)
  • Yossy was one of the testers from my book, and specifically one who tested the Basic, Great, Chocolate Chip Cookies. When I had her thumbs up, I knew the recipe was right. (Apt 2 Baking Co)
  • Sarah was also generous enough to give the recipes a go for me, and she decided to write about the Twangy Blueberry Sauce. My Ben loves it on cheesecake, I like it on plain yogurt, and everyone around here likes it on sweet biscuits with cream. (The Vanilla Bean Blog)
  • Stephanie made the happiest cookies ever. That yellow! (I Am a Food Blog)
  • Sasha shared personal thoughts on the passage of time and made the Glazed Sesame Oats. (Tending the Table)
  • Getting Sam and Megan's approval on any of my recipes, but especially the hummus, is a like a gold star. (A Sweet Spoonful)
  • Sonja and Alex made my Dipper Eggs with Fried Cheese Toast soldiers look far more elegant than I ever do. (A Couple Cooks)
  • The Blueberry Snacking Cake, which Sneh adapted beautifully, is one of our regulars for picnics and road trips. (Cook Republic)
  • Lecia always knows the right thing to say. In her post she captures the feelings of summer perfectly, and then bakes the Rhubarb Raspberry Rye Crumble. (A Day That is Dessert)

Now! To hear from you! What's been going on on your end? I'm so happy to be back to this place, and can't wait to pick up from where we left off. xo and talk soon. 

Posted
Authortara
Tagsrecent
17 CommentsPost a comment

Hey guys. I'm having trouble finding the start that seems right. I've tried, then deleted the attempt, then tried again, then got a drink, put in a load of laundry, and tried again. And deleted again. So let's take a deep breath and jump in. 

Seven Spoons cookbook first look + preview recipe bundle | Tara O'Brady

There. Much easier. My cookbook, Seven Spoons: My Favourite Recipes for Any and Every Day, comes out slightly-less-than two months from now. Specifically on April 21, 2015, which happens to be my birthday and nine days before the tenth anniversary of this site. The publishers, Ten Speed Press in the US and Appetite by Random House here at home, didn't know the significance of the date when they chose it, and the coincidence feels like kismet.

russeted apples and book preview recipe bundle!  | Tara O'Brady

Today I was going to tell you about how I came to write a book in the first place, but then I thought it might be nicer to work in reverse. Start with the book itself, and go backwards from there. Maybe I'll split it up into a few posts — one with how this all happened, and another on how I actually wrote the book and organized my work, if that sounds good to you. Then we can keep the conversation going. 

ploughman's lunch + book preview recipe bundle! | Tara O'Brady

As I said what feels ages ago, the cookbook was an opportunity to gather up the favourite recipes of my family and our friends, and finally nail down some of those go-to dishes that have thus far been without any recipe at all. I ended up at over 100 of them — I think the count is 114 — with more than 80 photos to match. I shot the photography in my home, around the region where I live, and up north in Muskoka, on days spread out over the year I took to write. So you'll see how the light changes with the seasons, and get an idea of how those plates looked on our table. (If you'd like, I can cover my approach to the photography in one of those posts I'll get on planning.)

I aimed to make a book that would be as useful on special occasions as it was in the day-to-day, whether craving a crackling plate of fried chicken burnished with gochuchang-laced honey, or some invigorating quick-pickled vegetables and herbed labneh bundled up in collard greens, or an icy sip in the form of a Paloma with chaat masala salt. There are recipes from my childhood (including a primer on dal), and Sean's too — I am thrilled about how the Walnut Cherry Butter Tart Pie turned out, based on his maternal grandmother's recipe —  as well as dishes we have come to call our own in recent years (baked colcannon, corn gazpacho, and sausage rolls with nuoc cham). While it does have vegetarian, vegan, whole-grain, gluten-free, and many other diet- and allergen- friendly recipes, the book has no fidelity to one set way of eating. It does have an overarching commitment to eating in season, and as locally as possible, with whole foods the usual. The collection is varied, suiting the way I eat, and hopefully you do too.

The book is simply organized to follow a day's worth of meals. It has Breakfast, Lunch, Soups, Snacks and Starters, then Suppers, Vegetables and Sides, followed by Treats, Sweets and Sips, and a chapter of Staples. 

cheesy mushrooms and greens + book preview recipe bundle | Tara O'Brady

In Seven Spoons the book, just like on this site, the stories of those dishes are included too. That said, a few had to be trimmed, even after we added pages to cram in as much as possible. I wanted to include those somewhere, and here seemed a good place. 

On the Pickled Strawberries (pictured above with chicken liver pâté as part of a ploughman's lunch): The first time I had pickled strawberries was in New York City, in a restaurant at the edge of Central Park. The place was packed, filled with people and noise, and a fierce windstorm was kicking up outside. Still, the strawberries pulled attention. Luminously scarlet, lacquered in juice, they were berries from Oz, daintily presented on top of succulent slices of fresh mozzarella. The supple cheek of sharp fruit against the cool, creamy blandness was startling. Refreshing and silky, each soured morsel had me wanting another.

On the Bostocks (I love bostocks): Nikole introduced me to bostocks. We were once waiting to cross at a busy corner in Toronto — Yonge at Roxborough Street East, if you happen to know the neighborhood — when she asked a question I couldn’t quite hear over the cars. It sounded like, "Have you ever had a bus stop?" Not understanding, I don't think I replied either way. She then led a block further down Yonge Street, to Patachou Patisserie (sadly, now shuttered).

In the front window, between apple turnovers and showy cinnamon swirls, was a cluster of plain, brown, icing sugar-dusted pucks labeled bostocks.

Those squat pastries proved remarkable at first bite. 

One Pot Brownies + book preview recipe bundle!  | Tara O'Brady

The book is available for pre-order, for those interested. As a special thanks, anyone who orders early gets a bundle of recipes right away, starting today. (Those who have already ordered get one, too!) There are five recipes from the book, including the North-Indian style baked eggs that some folks asked about, along with two exclusive to the package. These brownies are one of those recipes, with a super easy, fudge caramel glaze that takes them to fully over the top, rather than just slightly so. Click this link to claim your PDF; simply enter your information and follow the instructions. Then you're off to the races. Or the kitchen, as it were.

I'll sign off for now. I'm working with both my publishers to plan events around the book's launch — so if you'd like a visit do let me know! We'll also take the locations of pre-orders into account, so that kindness will be represented. Once confirmed, those dates and information will be added to the NEWS section on top menu bar.

Well then. This feels like a lot, yet feels really great. Thank you for reading this far, and for so long.

xo and happy days.

Posted
Authortara
Tagsrecent
28 CommentsPost a comment

Hello, hello! It's been a while, I know. Believe me, I know. I've been lost in book land, and the route back was a long road.

Roasted Peaches with Sesame Oats | Tara O'Brady
Ingredients O'Brady.jpg

I've not forgotten that we were to talk about storytelling, and this whole book business, and my own creative process. That is still happening, but in the meantime, David Lebovitz shared a brilliant post on the making of his latest book, My Paris Kitchen, and it is more than worth a read. (By the by, I've made the Croque Monsieur from that book more times than would be considered moderate. That recipe, and that book, is also more than worth a read. We'll be picking up on this later.)

Ontario Fruitstand | Tara O'Brady

And, still on that subject, my dear friend Aran of Cannelle et Vanille has asked me to teach a workshop at her gorgeous studio in Seattle this fall. I've been working on the course content as I finish up the book, so that I can offer the closest possible depiction of this time as I can. I don't now if I've mentioned it, but I am writing and photographing the book, in my home, mostly on my own. It has been a huge learning experience. And I look forward to sharing those lessons with you.

The workshop will examine and explore the nature of storytelling through multiple media. It will be from a writer's perspective, but everything from recipe development to styling and photography will be covered, with my creative process as the jump off to discovering your own. I am crazy excited about the subject and, what's more, the opportunity to dig deep and talk about the (sometimes messy) ins and outs of what I do.

If you'd like to be there, it would be an honour; registration is open at Aran's shop

Posted
Authortara
10 CommentsPost a comment

Friends, I'm writing a book.

I wanted to keep this business under wraps until I was sure it was really, truly, real. And now, it is. 

In the spring of 2015, around the ten-year anniversary of this site, my first cookbook will be published by Ten Speed Press and Appetite by Random House in Canada. 

(There's a lot in that paragraph right there that seems surreal.) 

Plums by Tara O'Brady

The book will be a collection of previously unpublished recipes, with only a few especially-loved ones revisited. When I was working up the proposal for the book, Sean noticed that the recipes on my prospective list were ones I already make; to him, they weren't new. And to me, that was the whole point. It is meant to be all the best from my kitchen, given to you. It is the meals I make in my day-to-day and for our celebrations, and the family secrets I've long wanted to get down on paper. It's a book we've lived and are still living, one tested and tried at our table.

The book is an extension of Seven Spoons. The funny thing about writing a blog is that while some may have started reading at the beginning in real-time, as years wear on, it's more and more likely that folks joined in along the way. So, there's never set course by which the story will be told. Parts can be read out of order, skipped even. A book gives the opportunity to set up a complete, contained work — it will be a sustained conversation, and one I'm excited to have.

Black + German Plums by Tara O'Brady

That said, the idea of a book still feels wobbly and whoa-boy-crazy sometimes. There's been moments when I've turned completely jello inside. But sharing the news with you pals, knowing one day I'll be sharing a book with you, well, that makes it great. Grand, stand-stand-up straight, arms wide, big grins, hurrah and yelping, super, happy great.  

In other words, your company makes it better. Makes this less intimidating, makes me less fearful. Everything more fun.

Actually, your company makes me better. Your company is what's at the heart and start of all of this. You've been here, sticking around, even when I was quiet, picking up right where we left off. You have been immeasurably kind. I am grateful and so very happy to know you.

plum rippled ginger crunch ice cream

It was the day before yesterday that I found out that the book had been officially announced. I read the email twice, squinting at my phone. Sean was home for lunch and right beside me. I was sure I was reading it wrong. It didn't sink in until later, until I was driving a few towns over, when laughter bubbled up. 

The last of the afternoon's errands had brought me out to a farm stand, one further than my usual. The weather had been showing off. I've got two coats ready for autumn but it was a wilting day of turned-up summer. The owner's daughter was behind the tables. Punnets were to her left, bigger baskets in the middle, then heaping bushels to her right.  Fruit and harvest got us talking, started us on that game of matching up favourites, of swapping tricks and tips and traditions. There was a discussion of peaches, the best for canning and eating, and talk of apricot jam. She offered me slices of fruit across the blade of her knife.

She told me some news, news that prompted me to share the photographs her mother let me take summer before last. She noticed her father's thermos of coffee, and I told her their plums were the stuff of legend. She walked me to the car, sending me away with more than I paid for, having pressed into my hand a bag weighted with Coronation grapes in tight, shadowy clusters, dusky purple-black, hugged up against a few, palm-sized, fat-bottomed pears with long stems. There were peaches already on the backseat, and plums in their baskets, ripe and full like water balloons, feeling as though their thin skins could only barely contain the sweetness within.

(If you're in Niagara, the stand is over on Victoria Avenue in Vineland, south of Claus Road. Drop me a line and I'll point you there.)

plum rippled ginger crunch ice cream

As I told her, I had in mind an ice cream stuffed with biscuits and plums, knobby in places with crunch, others smooth. In practice, it meant taking a prime extravagance and turning it into September's ice cream. Sharp and lush, this recipe is in honour of a family and the fruits of their farm, an ice cream that reminds me of the first time I drove out their way and found the sense to stop.  An ice cream as fancy as we needed to celebrate a book, as well as the years that brought us here, and the good fortune that brought me you.

Thank you for the bubbling laughter. 

(That was pretty smooshily said. Meant it just the same.)

 

 

 

PLUM RIPPLED GINGER CRUNCH ICE CREAM

Very much a plum crisp, frozen. I keep tripping over my words and calling it Plum Rumple Ice cream, which is how I sort of think of it. The fruit and crumbs and cream don't wholly blend, so the flavours are separate, yet in harmony.

FOR THE ICE CREAM BASE

  • 1 (14-ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 (14-ounce) can evaporated milk
  • 1 vanilla bean
  • A pinch of kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 cups heavy cream

FOR THE PLUM RIPPLE

  • 8 ounces plums, pitted, halved if small, quartered if large
  • 2-4 tablespoons brown sugar, depending on fruit
  • 1/4 teaspoon grated ginger

 

FOR THE GINGER CRUNCH

  • 4 ounces gingersnap cookies, homemade or store bought
  • 1 1/2 ounces pecans, toasted

METHOD 

To make the ice cream base, stir the condensed milk and evaporated milk together in a medium saucepan. Spilt the vanilla bean down its length, scraping out the seeds. Add both the seeds and the bean to the saucepan, along with a pinch of salt. Heat over medium-low heat until just under a simmer, stirring often.

Pour the mixture, including the vanilla pod, into a clean bowl or pitcher. Stir in 1 cup of the heavy cream and taste. It should be very sweet, but not uncomfortably so. If needed, add up to 1/2 cup more cream. Cover and chill the mixture in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours, and up to overnight.

While the base is chilling, make the plum ripple. Tumble the plums into small, heavy-bottomed saucepan along with 2 tablespoons of sugar and the grated ginger. Bring to a boil, stirring regularly, over medium heat, then reduce the heat to a simmer. Let the fruit blip away until the flesh is quite soft and the juices deeply coloured, around 3 to 5 minutes. Push the fruit through a fine-meshed sieve over a bowl, then pour the liquid back into the pan and simmer for 1 to 2 minutes more, stirring often. The sauce should look shiny and thick, with a fresh, true plum flavour, tangy but fairly sweet. Keeping in mind that the flavour will dull when frozen, , stir in additional sugar as needed. Set the plum sauce aside to cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

For the ginger crunch, simply crush the cookies in a mortar and pestle or in a resealable food bag with a rolling pin. The crumbs should be irregular, with some dust and some chunky bits. Pour the cookies into a bowl, then bash the toasted pecans the same way. Stir the nuts into the cookie rubble, and that's done.

To assemble, strain and freeze the ice cream base in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer's directions. When it reaches the consistency of soft serve, spoon the ice cream out into a large mixing bowl. Fold most of the ginger crunch through the ice cream with a few purposeful strokes. Do not over mix.  

Spoon one third of the ice cream into a lidded, freezer-safe storage container. Sprinkle some more of the crunch over the layer, then drizzle on a few long stripes of the plum sauce. With the tip of a thin-bladed knife, gently ripple the plum sauce into the cream. Top with half the remaining ice cream, and repeat the layers, ending with crumbs and plums. Cover and freeze for at least 3 hours.

Makes a generous quart of ice cream.

 

Note:  

  • The plums can be roasted instead of cooked on the stove. Arrange them snugly in a dish, toss them with the sugar and ginger, then pop it all into a moderately hot oven, say 400-425 degrees, until the fruit is soft. 
  • The crumble on my serving is pulverized candied pecans. They added some extra gilding to an already-fine day.

 

*Note: The book was tentatively-titled Well Fed, but that has since been changed. Some of the kind comments below reflect the earlier title. Thanks! 

 

Posted
Authortara
46 CommentsPost a comment